How To Effectively Hire College Graduates

How To Effectively Hire College Graduates

It’s July, and you’re suddenly in the market for a couple of entry-level sales development reps. Wouldn’t it be great if you could turn back time and attend your local university’s spring job fair to find fresh talent? Instead, you’re looking at a list of requirements with no real talent pipeline that you can turn to with ease.

Posting the job online will probably result in a surge of applications from recent graduates looking for employment, but you’re looking for quality, not quantity when it comes to a hire. Without attending any job fairs or networking with professors and counselors, it’s hard to separate the hungry, motivated applicants from the unqualified masses that are applying to any and every job they can find.

There are many ways that you can try to cater your hiring process to candidates that view your open role as more than just a stepping-stone for their resume, but here are two sure-fire ways you can make the biggest impact when it comes to hiring recent graduates:

Make the Application Unique

For people who are on the job-hunt, particularly recent graduates looking for entry-level work, online ads start to blend together. Your meticulously thought-out job description is one out of dozens that an applicant sees in any given day. If you want to avoid a pile-up of applications, then you need to make an applicant pause when they read your job description.

It could be as easy as an interesting or funny job description (minus the cutesy role titles, please!). You could even nix the resume, and ask for a LinkedIn profile and a haiku about your company.-recent grads don’t often have much relevant job experience to fall back on anyway. If you shake up your application process, you’ll be sure to cut down on the number of unqualified candidates that respond. Instead, you’ll attract candidates that are more creative, collaborative, and think that your role is worth whatever extra effort it requires.

Emphasise Mentorship

In our experience, the best thing about hiring employees straight out of college is their readiness to learn. Think: your developer has no bad habits, your new salesperson doesn’t complain about how the sales process differs from their last company. Instead, they are eager to soak up all of the training and mentorship opportunities you can offer them.

Capitalize on this as best as you can. Mention in your job description that a new employee will have daily or weekly meetings with their supervisor to talk about how the job is going and discuss any questions, concerns, or learning opportunities that come up. Give new employees (or even interviewees, if your staff is up to it) the opportunity to shadow your best salesperson or developer and foster an open and collaborative relationship between the two.

You want to attract employees that want to stay with your company for the long haul, and the best way to do that is to give them a clear and comprehensive understanding of their job and how it will progress over time. Establishing mentors early in the on-boarding process will help employees better understand where their job is headed and how they affect the company as a whole.

There you have it. Hiring recent graduates might seem unnecessarily daunting, but for many fast growing and nimble companies, finding those select candidates with raw talent will be well worth the effort. It’s certainly an investment to do it right, but you will be rewarded with great fresh talent, eager to learn and impact your business, and likely without a huge salary requirement that will give you pause.

Feeling uneasy about taking it all on yourself? Our team is always available to help guide you and make the process smooth, efficient, and most of all, successful. We’ve helped many companies take the right steps to tap into these pools of talent, and we’re here to show you as well!

 

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