What Is (And Isn't) Your Employer Brand

What Is (And Isn't) Your Employer Brand

In short: Employer branding is a culmination of your company’s mission, values, culture, and personality. It affects how successfully you can recruit new employees, retain and engage current employees, and differentiate yourself positively in the job market (enter Glassdoor). Here is a quick outline of what is (and isn’t!) a part of your employer brand, so you can start to take control over how you are perceived in the marketplace:

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Your Employer Brand Is:

  • A culmination of your vision, mission, values, and culture: It’s easy to let this develop on its own, but instead think about the element of your company that are attractive to applicants. These need to be highlighted in all of your employer branding.
  • What creates urgency and excitement about working with your team: Just like your product or service has a competitive advantage in its space, your company has unique abilities and attributes that help distinguish you from your competition and provides a compelling reason to work with you. A recent study concluded that 84% of people currently employed would consider leaving their job if offered a similar role at a company with an excellent reputation. Fostering an exciting employer brand will help you recruit better, and more engaged people to your team.

  • Influenced by your consumer brand: Consistency is key in employer branding. While you want to compliment the hard work of your marketing team’s efforts, you don’t want to simply rely on how they present your product or service to the world. Consider creating a separate landing page or social profile for the “careers” side of the business, and populate it with branded messaging that relies heavier on your mission and culture.

  • Aligned with what current employees think about your organization: Websites like Glassdoor make it very easy for potential applicants to get an idea of your workplace environment before they even apply to the job. Keep an eye on how your employees represent the brand with quarterly satisfaction surveys, and make sure that the positive elements of their points of view are reflected in your branding.

Your Employer Brand Is Not:

  • A collection of good or bad reviews online that you can’t do anything about: Keep tabs on what past and current employees say about your work environment on review sites and social media. Understand that there are always ways you can improve your culture. Take action as quickly as possible to address any concerns and spin any negative reviews into more positive brand outcomes for the future.

  • The same thing as your consumer brand: While we talked about alignment above, do not think that your employer brand is limited to what the marketing team puts out about your product and service. Take the initiative to weave in complimentary narratives about employee experiences and your company’s mission to create a more complete brand on your media outlets.

  • Just about popularity: Your goal when developing an employer brand is to stand out to the RIGHT people. You are trying to attract applicants with similar values who consider your company’s unique culture to be exciting and fulfilling. Your employer brand is a good way to discourage unqualified people from applying to be on your team- so don’t spend all of your time trying to be the most popular brand on the block. Instead, focus on the mission, and use it to attract a following that will be profitable for you in the long term

Link Round-Up: Candidate Experience

Link Round-Up: Candidate Experience

Important Indicators of Your Employer Brand in 2018

Important Indicators of Your Employer Brand in 2018